heccombappmen - Human-Elephant Conflict Mitigation A...

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Human-Elephant Conflict Mitigation A Training Course for Community-Based Approaches in Africa Participant’s Manual G.E. Parker, F.V. Osborn, R.E. Hoare & L.S. Niskanen
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Foreword Human-elephant conflict (HEC) is a complex and pervasive problem that occurs throughout the range of the African elephant wherever elephants and people share the same habitat, often competing for the same resources. HEC is recognized by the IUCN Species Survival Commission’s African Elephant Specialist Group (AfESG) as a major threat to the long-term survival of the species. Recent case studies from across sub-Saharan Africa have shown that communal crop- protection efforts, using an integrated package of simple, low cost and locally-adapted deterrence methods can quickly and effectively reduce local levels of elephant damage. While this can help to reduce site-specific conflict to tolerable levels, sustainable management of HEC will also require measures, such as national land-use planning and policy changes to ensure that affected communities receive a greater share of the benefits and fewer costs from living with elephants. Thus, while the community-based conflict mitigation methods that are the focus of this training course constitute an important “first line of defense”, long-term HEC mitigation needs to be supported by activities at higher levels. Making extensive use of real-life examples and case studies, combined with a strong practical element, this training course aims to provide African wildlife managers and local residents with the basic tools needed for effective community-based HEC management. The course material has been developed by some of Africa’s leading experts on HEC mitigation and covers all the essential topics in five comprehensive modules: 1. Responsibility for managing HEC; 2. Elephant behaviour & ecology in HEC situations; 3. Recording, reporting and analysis; 4. Overview of main mitigation measures currently in use and 5. Main steps in developing a community based HEC mitigation strategy. Taken together these modules are designed to equip HEC mitigation practitioners with the knowledge and skills needed to effectively manage conflict at the site level. I am therefore pleased to give this course the official seal of approval as a “certified training product” of the AfESG. Dr. Holly T. Dublin Chair IUCN/SSC African Elephant Specialist Group March 2007
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3 Acknowledgements We would like to acknowledge the support of WWF International who funded the development of this document. Sincere thanks also to the United States Fish and Wildlife Service and the UK Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs for providing core funding to the Secretariat of the IUCN/SSC African Elephant Specialist Group during the development of this document.
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This note was uploaded on 11/27/2011 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Robert during the Fall '08 term at Montgomery College.

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heccombappmen - Human-Elephant Conflict Mitigation A...

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