Covalent bonds in which the electrons are not shared equally are designated as polar covalent bonds

Covalent bonds in which the electrons are not shared equally are designated as polar covalent bonds

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Covalent bonds in which the electrons are not shared equally are designated as polar covalent bonds Polar covalent bonds have an asymmetrical charge distribution To be a polar covalent bond the two atoms involved in the bond must have different electronegativities. Polar and Nonpolar Covalent Bonds Some examples of polar covalent bonds. HF Polar and Nonpolar Covalent Bonds Shown below is an electron density map of HF. Blue areas indicate low electron density. Red areas indicate high electron density. Polar molecules have a separation of centers of negative and positive charge, an asymmetric charge distribution. Polar and Nonpolar Covalent Bonds Compare HF to HI.
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Unformatted text preview: Polar and Nonpolar Covalent Bonds Shown below are electron density maps of the hydrogen halides. Notice that the charge separation decreases as we move from HF to HI. Polar and Nonpolar Covalent Bonds Polar molecules can be attracted by magnetic and electric fields. Dipole Moments Molecules whose centers of positive and negative charge do not coincide, have an asymmetric charge distribution, and are polar. These molecules have a dipole moment. The dipole moment has the symbol . is the product of the distance,d, separating charges of equal magnitude and opposite sign, and the magnitude of the charge, q. Dipole Moments...
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This note was uploaded on 11/25/2011 for the course CHEM 1211 taught by Professor Atwood during the Fall '07 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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