Central Intelligence and Point of View

Central Intelligence and Point of View - Central...

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Unformatted text preview: Central Intelligence and Point of View One of James' contributions to the art of fiction is in his use of point of view. By point of view is meant the angle from which the story is told. For example, previous to James' novels, much of the fiction of the day was being written from the author's viewpoint, that is, the author was telling the story and he was directing the reader's response to the story. Much of the fiction of the nineteenth century had the author as the storyteller, and the author would create scenes in which certain characters would be involved, but each scene would not necessarily have the same characters in them. James' fiction differs in his treatment of point of view. He was interested in establishing a central person about whom the story revolved. Usually. the reader would have to see all the action of the story through this character's eyes. This central character was called at times the "central story through this character's eyes....
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This note was uploaded on 11/27/2011 for the course ENG 1310 taught by Professor Pilkington during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Central Intelligence and Point of View - Central...

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