Aeschylus was also renowned for the magnificence of his poetic diction

Aeschylus was also renowned for the magnificence of his poetic diction

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Unformatted text preview: Aeschylus was also renowned for the magnificence of his poetic diction, which surpassed that of all his contemporaries, and for the elaborate staging and pageantry of his productions (a good example of this is the colorful spectacle of Agamemnon's homecoming in The Oresteia ). His works indicate that he was an ardent patriot and a firm believer in the Athenian democracy. He was also a serious religious thinker. In his hands the old myths became powerful expressions of crucial moral and theological problems. Imbued with the confident spirit of fifth-century Athens, Aeschylus wrote tragedies that were paeans of faith in the benevolence of the universe and the perfectibility of humanity. Few details of his life are still remembered, and most of them serve mainly to whet the curiosity. Aeschylus was married and had two sons, Euphorion and Bion, both of whom carried on the family...
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