Aristotle goes on to discuss the structure of the ideal tragic plot and spends several chapters on i

Aristotle goes on to discuss the structure of the ideal tragic plot and spends several chapters on i

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Unformatted text preview: Aristotle goes on to discuss the structure of the ideal tragic plot and spends several chapters on its requirements. He says that the plot must be a complete whole with a definite beginning, middle, and end and its length should be such that the spectators can comprehend without difficulty both its separate parts and its overall unity. Moreover, the plot requires a single central theme in which all the elements are logically related to demonstrate the change in the protagonist's fortunes, with emphasis on the dramatic causation and probability of the events. Aristotle has relatively less to say about the tragic hero because the incidents of tragedy are often beyond the hero's control or not closely related to his personality. The plot is intended to illustrate matters of cosmic rather than individual significance, and the protagonist is viewed primarily as the...
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Aristotle goes on to discuss the structure of the ideal tragic plot and spends several chapters on i

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