At dawn the next day

At dawn the next day - At dawn the next day Aeneas sick of...

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Unformatted text preview: At dawn the next day, Aeneas, sick of slaughter, hangs Mezentius's armor on a big oak trunk as a memorial to the fallen king and as a sign of victory, and then tells his men that the time has come to march on Latinus. But first, he says, the dead must be ceremonially burned and buried, and Pallas must be returned to Pallanteum. Aeneas mourns for the slain youth and pities his father, Evander, who is unaware of his son's death. Pallas's body is placed on a bier and sent off with an escort of a thousand men, plus spoils of war, sacrificial captives, and Pallas's horse, riderless. This procession is followed by a line of mourners. Now envoys come from Laurentum seeking a truce and asking Aeneas to allow the return of the Latin dead for burial. Aeneas grants this request, saying that he wants peace, and that he is willing to engage Turnus in single combat as a way of resolving the conflict. The Latin envoy Drancës, who is engage Turnus in single combat as a way of resolving the conflict....
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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