Between the late summer of 1919 and March of 1920 when Edith Wharton wrote The Age of Innocence

Between the late summer of 1919 and March of 1920 when Edith Wharton wrote The Age of Innocence

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Between the late summer of 1919 and March of 1920 when Edith Wharton wrote  The Age of  Innocence,  she was in her late 50s and highly sought after by publishers. Having lived through World  War I in Europe and seen its tremendous destruction, Wharton turned readers' thoughts back to the  time following the Civil War, when America's expansion, increased industrialism, and wealth from the  railroads produced a group of robber barons and financiers, such as the Vanderbilts, Astors, and  other newly rich families, who built huge mansions in New York City and began summering in  Newport with the Old Rich. At first New York society rejected these "upstarts," but eventually the  nouveau riches  (New Rich) bent their talents toward social reform and philanthropy, which moved  them up in the social order. They also began to marry their way into the Old Rich's circle, creating the  interrelated families described later in Wharton's novel. 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

Between the late summer of 1919 and March of 1920 when Edith Wharton wrote The Age of Innocence

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online