Book II of The Age of Innocence begins with May marrying Newland as New York society watches

Book II of The Age of Innocence begins with May marrying Newland as New York society watches

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Unformatted text preview: Book II of The Age of Innocence begins with May marrying Newland as New York society watches. By August, a year later, Newland and May have settled into a fashionable if boring life in New York, living in a wealthy part of town and spending summers with the rest of the rich in Newport. Ellen has moved to Washington D.C.; she returns to stay with her grandmother briefly, but later leaves to visit Boston. Still under her spell, Newland lies to his wife and follows Ellen there. Ellen promises to stay in America only if they do not hurt May with a clandestine affair. She returns to Washington. Meanwhile, Julius Beaufort's shady financial dealings catch up with him, and his wife, Regina, appeals to Ellen's grandmother for help. Mrs. Mingott suffers a stroke and sends for Ellen to nurse her; during the two-hour carriage ride with Ellen from the train station, Newland suggests they have...
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