Chapter 32 begins what could be called the last segment of the novel

Chapter 32 begins what could be called the last segment of the novel

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Chapter 32 begins what could be called the last segment of the novel. Huck's solemn narration is  evident at the beginning of the chapter, when he describes the breeze that occasionally washes over  the farm. For Huck, the breeze comes across as a whisper of spirits long dead, and readers are  reminded of those that have already died earlier in the novel. The entire journey appears to weigh  heavily on Huck, and at one point he "wished I was dead" after hearing the lonesome hum of a  spinning wheel. In a sense, the Phelps farm is symbolic of Huck's return back to civilization.  Although he and Jim have traveled hundreds of miles down the Mississippi River, they find  themselves in a situation very similar to the life they left with Miss Watson and the Widow Douglas. Huck's climatic decision to free Jim has brought about an unconscious epiphany or revelation in 
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Chapter 32 begins what could be called the last segment of the novel

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