Clytaemestra is no longer obligated to restrain herself or conceal her inner thoughts in this final

Clytaemestra is no longer obligated to restrain herself or conceal her inner thoughts in this final

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Clytaemestra is no longer obligated to restrain herself or conceal her inner thoughts in  this final scene. She exults openly after killing her husband and shows no remorse or  shame. She proudly asserts that her acts were righteous, and the elders are unable to  contradict her because so many ethical strands have become tangled by the tragic  history of the family of Atreus. Clytaemestra also defies the threats of the chorus and  asserts her control over Aegisthus and the kingdom. It can now be seen what bitterness  had built up within her while Agamemnon was still alive, but she demonstrates superb  poise and self-possession at the height of her triumph. The central place that  Clytaemestra has held in the tragedy is emphasized by the fact that she speaks the last  lines of the play, for normally this privilege was reserved for the chorus. Agamemnon 
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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