Katniss is finding it increasingly difficult to hide her emotions from the audience

Katniss is finding it increasingly difficult to hide her emotions from the audience

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Katniss is finding it increasingly difficult to hide her emotions from the audience. She must constantly  remember to act as a brave tribute should, showing no remorse for the deaths of her opponents. Just  as she has always had to mask her hatred for the Capitol, she must also mask her hatred for the  Games and for all they do to destroy the lives of these tributes and their families. She considers, too,  what the Games must do to its victors. For the first time, she imagines how hard it must be for  Haymitch to go through the pain of the Games and of losing his tributes each year. He has never  married and doesn't have any children. His is a lonely life, and the reader is led to believe that many  of his problems, including his drinking, are results of his Hunger Games victory. Katniss worries that  she will end up that way, too. Just as Peeta wanted to remain true to his identity during the Games, 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online