Less concerned with the life and adventures of Aeneas than with the part he played in founding the R

Less concerned with the life and adventures of Aeneas than with the part he played in founding the R

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Less concerned with the life and adventures of Aeneas than with the part he played in founding the  Roman state, the  Aeneid  is a national epic, a glorification and exaltation of Rome and its people.  Virgil has a spiritualized, idealistic, and aspiring conception of Rome, which he views as majestic and  sacred, ordained by destiny to rule the world. He saw a golden age of human life emerging during  Augustus's reign, a golden age brought about by the gods. The  Aeneid  is designed to exalt this new,  ordered society and to glorify its virtues and finest features by their personification in Aeneas, an  epic hero who is meant to represent the archetypal Roman. Aeneas embodies the most important  Roman personal qualities and attributes, particularly the Roman sense of duty and responsibility that  Virgil thought of as having built the Rome he loved. During the century prior to Augustus's rule, the Roman republic was ravaged by a constant series of 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/23/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online