Lest we feel that Virgil is more concerned with gods than humans

Lest we feel that Virgil is more concerned with gods than humans

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Unformatted text preview: Lest we feel that Virgil is more concerned with gods than humans, he provides a well- rounded portrait of his Trojan hero. Almost all of Aeneas's major roles are presented by the end of Book I. His shooting seven stags one for each of the remaining ships highlights his role as provider to his people. He is both comforter and motivator when he addresses his companions, rousing their spirits and reminding them that fate has decreed their success. And twice Virgil draws attention to how good a father Aeneas is to Ascanius, describing him as "father Aeneas" and "fond father, as always thoughtful of his son." The most important role Aeneas assumes is that of dutiful servant of fate and of the gods, entirely faithful to attaining his goal. The epic's opening lines attest to this character trait: Aeneas is "a man apart, devoted to his mission." Later in Book I, Virgil character trait: Aeneas is "a man apart, devoted to his mission....
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