Many of the roles previously associated with Aeneas are present in Book VI

Many of the roles previously associated with Aeneas are present in Book VI

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Unformatted text preview: Many of the roles previously associated with Aeneas are present in Book VI. Chief among these models of behavior are his exemplary leadership abilities and his deep feelings of humanity. Told by Deiphob that a Trojan warrior needs burial before Aeneas will be allowed to enter the underworld, the Trojan hero leads his men in offering the proper funeral rites for Misenus. Rather than merely instructing his men on what to do, Aeneas, deeply moved by his Trojan comrade's death, performs the rituals himself: "All who were there / Clamored around the body in lament, / Aeneas, the good captain, most of all." When he meets Dido, who now walks eternally in the Fields of Mourning, Aeneas poignantly weeps. Whether or not he was the primary cause of her demise consumes him: "Was I, was I the cause? / I swear by heaven's stars, by the high gods, / By any him: "Was I, was I the cause?...
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