Newland is feeling embarrassed because the males in the audience are watching the Mingott box and he

Newland is feeling embarrassed because the males in the audience are watching the Mingott box and he

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Newland is feeling embarrassed because the males in the audience are watching the  Mingott box and he is trying to decide on a course of action to protect his beloved May  from scandal. He realizes that the mystery lady must be May's cousin, the Countess  Ellen Olenska, who recently arrived from Europe. Disgracefully, she has left her  husband and is staying with her grandmother, old Mrs. Mingott. While Newland  approves of family loyalty in private, he would prefer the Wellands not exercise it in  public with the "black sheep" of the family. Newland listens to the other men make jokes about Ellen's past and his embarrassment  grows. He waits for the curtain to signal the end of the act and does the loyal and manly  thing: He dashes for the Mingott family box where May gratefully consents to his request  that he announce their engagement. She then introduces him to her cousin, Ellen, who 
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Newland is feeling embarrassed because the males in the audience are watching the Mingott box and he

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