Recognition scenes like this one involving Electra and Orestes were common features of later Greek t

Recognition scenes like this one involving Electra and Orestes were common features of later Greek t

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Recognition scenes like this one involving Electra and Orestes were common features of  later Greek tragedy. The recognition scene in  The Choephori  is the earliest to survive  and was parodied by Euripides in his  Electra.  The circumstances of the recognition are  artificial and seem a little implausible, but the scene fulfills an important function, and  Aeschylus was probably not concerned with achieving an effect of verisimilitude. His  main interest was to bring Orestes and Electra together so that the intrigue that is the  basis of the plot could get under way. Neither Orestes nor Electra is a full character in the modern theatrical sense, for  Aeschylus does not attempt to examine too deeply their psychological or emotional  states. To some extent, Orestes is an instrument in the hand of Apollo. He is dominated  by the oracle's command and does not question his obligation to kill Clytaemestra. 
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Recognition scenes like this one involving Electra and Orestes were common features of later Greek t

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