The doors of the palace open to reveal Orestes standing beside the dead bodies of Aegisthus and Clyt

The doors of the palace open to reveal Orestes standing beside the dead bodies of Aegisthus and Clyt

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: The doors of the palace open to reveal Orestes standing beside the dead bodies of Aegisthus and Clytaemestra. Servants display the bloodstained netlike robe in which Clytaemestra entangled Agamemnon before she slew him. Pointing to the robe and the corpses, Orestes turns to the chorus and assembled people and justifies his action by citing the crimes committed by his victims and their tyrannous rule over Argos. He has done his duty by avenging Agamemnon, but he admits that it was painful for him to kill his mother, saying, "I have won; but my victory is soiled and has no pride." As he speaks, Orestes becomes restless and agitated. He begins to feel as if he is losing his mind and insists desperately that the killing of his mother was right and that he acted according to the command of Apollo. But now, he says, he must forfeit the inheritance he has just regained, leave Argos once more, and wander as a homeless outcast....
View Full Document

Page1 / 2

The doors of the palace open to reveal Orestes standing beside the dead bodies of Aegisthus and Clyt

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online