The Eumenides ends on an exalted note of reconciliation and optimism

The Eumenides ends on an exalted note of reconciliation and optimism

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Eumenides  ends on an exalted note of reconciliation and optimism. Orestes and his  family have no part in the closing scene of the play. Their absence at the moment of  resolution and the knowledge that the trial of Orestes was conducted on extraneous  grounds and really solved nothing indicate that their role in the trilogy is symbolic.  Aeschylus used the story of the family of Atreus to provide illustrative material for his  analysis of the central issue of the trilogy — the nature of justice. At the conclusion of the trilogy, the Furies, who were originally the uncompromising  agents of destiny and divine retribution, are mystically converted into benevolent spirits  although their insistence that authority and discipline are essential components of  society is heeded. A new social and moral dispensation is established by Zeus through  his daughter Athene, the personification of wisdom. Justice will now be secured by an 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Ask a homework question - tutors are online