The opening sentence of the novel notifies readers that Huck Finn is the narrator and will tell his

The opening sentence of the novel notifies readers that Huck Finn is the narrator and will tell his

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Unformatted text preview: The opening sentence of the novel notifies readers that Huck Finn is the narrator and will tell his story in his own words, in his own language and dialect (complete with grammatical errors and misspellings), and from his own point of view. By using the first person narrative point of view, Twain carries on the southwestern humor tradition of vernacular language; that is, Huck sounds as a young, uneducated boy from Missouri should sound. This first sentence also alludes to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer . The allusion reminds the reader of a novel about boys and their adventures, the purpose of which, according to Twain, was to rekindle in adults memories "of how they felt and thought and talked, and what queer enterprises they sometimes engaged in." Then Huck and Twain dismiss the work with "But that ain't no matter." Although the boyish type adventure episodes tend to reappear as a plot motif in matter....
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