The reasons for the escape to Jackson

The reasons for the escape to Jackson - The reasons for the...

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Unformatted text preview: The reasons for the escape to Jackson's Island are varied. Tom feels depressed and dejected because of Becky Thatcher's rejection of him. Joe Harper's situation is similar: He is depressed because his mother punished him for throwing out some cream--a crime of which he is innocent. (Later, in fact, his mother will despair after Joe is "dead" because she remembers throwing out the cream herself.) Like Tom, Joe wants to escape "civilization," but he is also the first to tire of the island and the first who wants to return to his family. For Huck Finn, who has no responsibilities and no one to notice that he is gone, one place is as good as another. Each boy assumes a pirate name, and these names come from books that Tom has read. Twain makes a subtle, albeit important contrast from the natural common sense intelligence of Huck Finn to the acquired fanciful ideas that Tom Sawyer gets from his books. Tom, for example, has idealized ideas about what pirates look like and how they act--based on the various books that he has read. ideas about what pirates look like and how they act--based on the various books that he has read....
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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The reasons for the escape to Jackson - The reasons for the...

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