Using all types of exaggerations and embroidering the story as much as possible

Using all types of exaggerations and embroidering the story as much as possible

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Using all types of exaggerations and embroidering the story as much as possible, Tom tells of his  and Becky's wonderful adventure. He thoroughly enjoys the attention of the people who listened  intently to his every word. Three days and nights in the cave have drained the strength of both Tom and Becky; Tom gets better  in three days, but it takes a week for Becky to regain her strength. Meanwhile, Tom has heard of  Huck's illness, and he visits him, but the Widow Douglas refuses to allow Tom to tell about his  awesome adventure in the cave. Tom does hear that the ragged man was found drowned in the river  while trying to escape. About two weeks later, Tom goes by to visit Becky. Judge Thatcher tells him  that he has had the cave locked and secured so that no other children can get inside. "Tom turned as  white as a sheet" and explains that "Injun Joe is in the cave." The true importance of this chapter is Twain's narration. The reader is very concerned over the fate 
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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