Virgil begins his epic poem with a succinct statement of its theme

Virgil begins his epic poem with a succinct statement of its theme

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Unformatted text preview: Virgil begins his epic poem with a succinct statement of its theme: He will sing of war and the man Aeneas who, driven by fate, sailed from Troy's shores to Italy, where he founded a city called Lavinium, the precursor of Rome. Why, Virgil asks, appealing to the muse of epic poetry, does Juno, the queen of the gods, harass such a good man? He mentions two explicit reasons for Juno's hostility: her love for Carthage and corresponding hatred for the future Rome, which is destined to overthrow her favorite city; and her lingering resentment because Paris, a Trojan, did not award her the golden apple, the prize given to the most beautiful woman in the world. She also hates the Trojans because one of their ancestors was Dardanus, the son of Jupiter Juno's husband and king of the gods and Electra, a daughter of Atlas and Juno's rival for...
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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