When Huck contemplates his future aboard the raft in Chapter 31

When Huck contemplates his future aboard the raft in Chapter 31

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Unformatted text preview: When Huck contemplates his future aboard the raft in Chapter 31, readers contemplate it with him. And when Huck firmly states, "All right, then, I'll go to hell," readers realize that the decision is based on emotion, as well as Huck's normal logic and pragmatism, which he never escapes. This scene in Chapter 31, for example, is reminiscent of Chapter 16, in which Huck saves Jim by deceiving the men looking for runaway slaves by intimating that there was scarlet fever on the raft. There, he felt "bad and low because I knowed very well I had done wrong . . . ." He reasons, however, that he would have felt the same way if he had turned Jim in, and he concludes, " . . . what's the use of learning to do right when it's troublesome to do right and it ain't no trouble to do wrong, and the wages is just the same." In all his previous experiences, Huck retains his indifferent persona, yet, at wages is just the same....
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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