It is obvious that such an exchange imposes upon Alice simply more insecurity and feelings of guilt

It is obvious that such an exchange imposes upon Alice simply more insecurity and feelings of guilt

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Unformatted text preview: It is obvious that such an exchange imposes upon Alice simply more insecurity and feelings of guilt. Yet those kinds of feelings cannot be sustained for long; all too quickly they become hostile and negative. It is all Alice can do to contain her anger. The strength of her repressed feelings is a bit amusing to the reader. Her deliberate, determined restraint reveals the secret of much of the story's tension. Her self-control is remarkably exaggerated because Alice is a "proper little girl." The Caterpillar's attitude has so frustrated her that Alice turns to leave him, but he pleads with her to come back, and after she reluctantly does, he says: "Keep your temper." "Is that all?" asks Alice, more angry than ever. The Caterpillar then further outrages her. He asks her how she thinks she has changed. Alice tells him that she can't remember things and that her size is...
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