The White Rabbit

The White Rabbit -...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The White Rabbit, meanwhile, has lost his patience and followed Alice to his house. He is in a  furious mood, which frightens Alice, so she prevents him from entering the house. The humor here is  due to the fact of Alice's being many, many times larger than the rabbit and, logically, she should  have no reason at all to fear him. Nonetheless, the White Rabbit's angry, brusque orders are terribly  intimidating to her because the White Rabbit  sounds  like an adult. For Alice (a well-trained child), no  matter how impolite an adult is, an adult must be minded and must be feared. Adults may be a  puzzle (and rude) but, to a child, their domination must be accepted  at all times.  Alice's real world  society, then, is responsible for her behavior here and is further enforced by her class  consciousness. Prevented from entering his own house, the White Rabbit calls to his gardener, Pat. Here, note that 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online