When Erich Maria Remarque was mustered out of the Great War in 1918 on a medical discharge

When Erich Maria Remarque was mustered out of the Great War in 1918 on a medical discharge

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When Erich Maria Remarque was mustered out of the Great War in 1918 on a medical discharge, he  returned home to a life devoid of hope and changed forever. His earlier dreams had included  becoming a concert pianist, but, because of war wounds, that ambition was no longer a possibility.  During the time he had been in combat, his mother had died and now he had time to mourn and  regret. Remarque, like many of his lost generation, suffered postwar trauma and disillusionment.  This one huge and overwhelming event in his life — World War I — would haunt him forever and  influence practically everything he would write. Again and again, Remarque would return to scenes  of the war and to postwar Germany for subjects of his novels. The world would read his words and  understand the questions of his generation, and the critics would treat his book kindly. Modern  readers return again and again to his words because their powerful message delineates a 
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When Erich Maria Remarque was mustered out of the Great War in 1918 on a medical discharge

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