After Rawlins and John Grady arrive in Encantada and are put in the tiny prison cell with Blevins an

After Rawlins and John Grady arrive in Encantada and are put in the tiny prison cell with Blevins an

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: After Rawlins and John Grady arrive in Encantada and are put in the tiny prison cell with Blevins and the old man (who doesn't even know how long he has been there or for what crime), John Grady can still dream of horses when he sleeps. He dreams he runs among the horses, mares, and colts, all of them moving like music, without fear; "They ran in that resonance which is the world itself and which cannot be spoken but only praised." This ability to dream of horses shows that in the middle of his terrible predicament, John Grady is still strongly attached to nature, that his basic spirit is still whole. It isn't just his idealism and ethics that motivate John Grady; it is his whole sense of what is good on the earth that pushes him to make the decisions he does. The way of the land, nature, and the horses have all been his greatest teachers. From them he has learned that one does not abandon horses have all been his greatest teachers....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/23/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online