Dove -...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Dove's strongest feminist commentary derives from the housewife's private burden in "Dusting," the  poet's most analyzed, anthologized poem. Keeping physically and mentally busy, Beulah challenges  a nagging despair with fantasy. While hands combat the "grainstorms" with a gray dustrag, her mind  flies free of housewifery to ponder the name of a boy who kissed her at the fair. Was it Michael? As  though polishing her life, she rubs the furniture to a bright shine. Too late, an answer comes to her —  Maurice, an exotic not-Thomas kind of name. In subsequent entries, Dove pursues her  grandmother's emotional displacement. The grit of "Dusting" returns in the form of "Nightmare," a  twenty-four-line torment that ends with a memory of her mother's cry — "you'll ruin us" — for opening  an umbrella indoors, a violation of folkways. The verse cycle closes with "The Oriental Ballerina," a shifting, iridescent picture story centering on 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online