First - First, we read long scenes in which John Grady and...

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Unformatted text preview: First, we read long scenes in which John Grady and Rawlins break the sixteen mustangs. The animals are so wild that John Grady says they do not smell like horses, they smell like wild animals. The horses are a varied lot in color, and some are spotted horses, or paints, which is reminiscent of Faulkner's short story "Spotted Horses." But here the boys are not pulling a con to sell the ponies; they are going to make them into decent riding or work horses for the ranch. They use a method called sidelining to break the horses, which involves hobbling the horses so that when they kick and buck they fall down. In traditional bronc busting, a couple of cowboys catch and hold down a horse, putting a saddle on it. Then a brave "bronc-peeler," as Blevins had claimed to be, gets on and rides the bucking horse until it tires out and starts to run straight. This method of breaking horses can be witnessed at some rodeos where a "wild horse" division is put on. The work breaking horses can be witnessed at some rodeos where a "wild horse" division is put on....
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First - First, we read long scenes in which John Grady and...

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