Gradually relinquishing dependence on a tightly formed quatrain

Gradually relinquishing dependence on a tightly formed quatrain

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Gradually relinquishing dependence on a tightly formed quatrain, Parts II and III of the stanza speak  clearly about Pound's annoyance with poetry that fails to acknowledge the "accelerated grimace" of  the post–World War I era. To the poet, an artistic theft of the "classics in paraphrase" is preferable to  a self-indulgent "inward gaze," his term for confessional verse that obsesses over personal feelings  and sentimentality. In his estimation, no rigid plaster can suffice in an era that demands agile, up-to- date language. In a rage at commercialism, Part III surges back into the allusive mode with cryptic  poetic shards contrasting Edwardian niceties and Sappho's spirited verses. Segueing into religion,  Pound makes a similar comparison of the erotic Dionysians and breast-beating Christians. By Parts IV and V, Pound has shucked off the constraints of pre-modern verse forms to embrace an 
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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