Remarque vividly recounts the horror of constant death as Paul comes upon scenes of destruction

Remarque vividly recounts the horror of constant death as Paul comes upon scenes of destruction

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Unformatted text preview: Remarque vividly recounts the horror of constant death as Paul comes upon scenes of destruction. In Chapter 6, he sees a Frenchman who dies under German fire. The man's body collapses, hands suspended, and then his body drops away with only the stumps of arms and hands hanging in the wire and the rest of his body on the ground. They later come upon a scene with dead bodies whose bellies are swollen like balloons. "They hiss, belch, and make movements. The gases in them make noises." The smell of blood and putrefaction is overwhelming and causes many of Paul's company to be nauseated and retch. The assault on the senses is overwhelming. They later pile the dead in a shell hole with "three layers so far." This horrifying picture is grimly elaborated on in Chapter 9 when they pass through a forest where there are bodies of victims of trench mortars. It is a "forest of the they pass through a forest where there are bodies of victims of trench mortars....
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Remarque vividly recounts the horror of constant death as Paul comes upon scenes of destruction

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