The controlled artistry of the poem summons blues syncopation and repetitions

The controlled artistry of the poem summons blues syncopation and repetitions

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Unformatted text preview: The controlled artistry of the poem summons blues syncopation and repetitions, linking lines with a loose rhyme scheme comprised of simple monosyllables for example, tune/croon, play/sway, and night/light. At high points in the development, the poet moves to a dominance of oo and ooh sounds. The subdued sound, like a jazz lament, overwhelms the text with a self-induced inertia that condemns the singer for his soul-paralyzing melancholy, the result of a lifelong indulgence in self- pity. In 1927, Hughes perpetuated his music-based verse in "Song for a Dark Girl," a twelve-line ditty that develops a keen-edged irony through repetitions of "Way Down South in Dixie," the closing line of the Confederacy's unofficial national anthem. Stoutly rhythmic, the three-beat lines alternate feminine and masculine rhymes of Dixie/me to land firm-footed on the monosyllabic "tree," a fusion of the...
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