The convergence in stanzas 11 through 16 illustrates why critics disagree in their assessment of Pla

The convergence in stanzas 11 through 16 illustrates why critics disagree in their assessment of Pla

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The convergence in stanzas 11 through 16 illustrates why critics disagree in their assessment of  Plath's skill. Clever and inventive in the drumming beats and assonance of oh and oo sounds in "go,"  "glue," "screw," "you," and "through," the picture of a cloven-footed demon biting a child's heart  precedes self-destruction. No longer the sturdy, willful persona of the opening stanzas, the poet- speaker suffers from suicide attempts, the patchwork of psychoanalysis, and a "fat black heart," a  guilt-soaked conscience which she plants in her father's breast. A mental picture of the tormenter  adept at rack and screw compels her to say "I do, I do," an oral implication of perverse sex and  emotional marriage to the father. In the guise of a vengeful bride of Dracula, she kills off the real and  the imagined father, a monstrous, self-damning double murder intended to set her free.
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