The horse scenes add detail and interest to the story and provide a setting for the development of J

The horse scenes add detail and interest to the story and provide a setting for the development of J

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The horse scenes add detail and interest to the story and provide a setting for the development of  John Grady's character. The first time John Grady and Rawlins go into the mountains to catch  horses, the old man who accompanies them recounts his own history and how he fought in the  cavalry where his father and brothers had died. He tells them of the horses killed under him and how  horses love war, just like men do. He says the souls of horses mirror the souls of men, explaining  that if you could understand the soul of a horse, one could understand all horses, but that to  understand human beings is probably only an illusion. John Grady also is tutored in the ways of  horses by Antonio, the one who helps with the breeding of the mares. Antonio, too, has many ideas  about horses and tells John Grady he never lies to the stallion. The section of the chapter that deals with the breeding of the horses and John Grady's riding of the 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online