Williams - Williams a master of surprise disarms the reader...

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Unformatted text preview: Williams, a master of surprise, disarms the reader with a fresh approach to sexual attraction. The irony of the flower's "taking / the field by force" reverses the romantic notion of femininity compromised by heavy-handed male passion. As though examining a human patient, the poet- speaker imagines arousing the flower to "the fibres of her being." Implicit in his reverie is the inborn flaw, the purple center that mars the unblemished whiteness of each stalk. Williams expresses its uniqueness in an optical corollary: If the flower were totally white, the field would vanish in the unity of color. As it exists in nature, the flower's modified purity halts the scene from "[going] over" into the nothingness of perfection. "Spring and All" (1923), one of Williams' most anthologized poems, abandons normal sentence structure to string together surreal impressions of an emerging season. The setting, on an unremarkable drive to "the contagious hospital," suggests the contagion of emergence, which will...
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Williams - Williams a master of surprise disarms the reader...

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