Dreiser - Dreiser's protagonist-victim lusts after the...

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Unformatted text preview: Dreiser's protagonist-victim lusts after the American Dream of Success. He is disposed to the acquisition of material wealth in order to buy expensive clothes, to be chauffeured around in handsome automobiles, and to dine in luxurious restaurants. He yearns for amorous adventures, both erotic and romantic. He trusts in adventurous companions, pleasure seekers like himself who indulge in parties, brightly lit and full of music. And, finally, he deems personal freedom and independence of utmost importance, as a way to escape pain, responsibility, restraint, and family. Throughout his short life, Clyde has seen his family's narrow reliance on prayer and precept bring no success, only trouble. His resigned father, unlike his rich uncle, is a failure. Clyde loathes his family's poverty and ignorance, their inability to help him and to give him the things he craves. He resents his poverty and ignorance, their inability to help him and to give him the things he craves....
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This note was uploaded on 11/27/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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