Ironically - Ironically, the jury is convinced of Clyde's...

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Unformatted text preview: Ironically, the jury is convinced of Clyde's guilt even before they sit in judgment. Clyde (the moviegoer) watches Mason in his dynamic role of prosecutor as if someone had shouted: "Lights! Camera!" Mason asserts that Clyde has had more religious, social, and educational advantages than the jurists. As he well knows, Belknap ironically warns the court that it is so easy to distort any set of circumstances. What his lawyers direct him to explain to the jury, Clyde believes: that before meeting Sondra he loved Roberta enormously; ironically, neither Clyde nor the narrator acknowledges the fact that Clyde met Sondra before he knew Roberta. Based on the judge's very specific charge, Clyde is not guilty of first-degree murder: He struck no intentional blow and the boat capsized accidentally....
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Ironically - Ironically, the jury is convinced of Clyde's...

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