On his return to Paris

On his return to Paris - On his return to Paris, he trusted...

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Unformatted text preview: On his return to Paris, he trusted Tom Tristram to find some suitable rooms for him, even though Mrs. Tristram warned that the place would be hideous if Tom picked it out. But when Newman saw the place which was "gilded from floor to ceiling" and draped in various shades of satin, he thought the place magnificent. Sometime later, Mrs. Tristram tells Newman that she had met Madame de Cintr coming out of a church where she had gone for confession. She explains that the lady suffers rather harshly "from her wicked old mother and her Grand Turk of a brother." But according to Mrs. Tristram, Madame de Cintr's suffering illuminates her "saintliness and makes her perfect." Newman wonders if Madame de Cintr is not free to do as she pleases. Mrs. Tristram explains that legally she is free but there is a moral obligation to the family. She fears that Claire de Cintr is being legally she is free but there is a moral obligation to the family....
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On his return to Paris - On his return to Paris, he trusted...

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