One of the most striking features of Anthem is its use of language

One of the most striking features of Anthem is its use of language

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Unformatted text preview: One of the most striking features of Anthem is its use of language, especially the absence of the word "I." Characters refer to themselves using the first person plural "we" and not the first person singular "I." This use of language is often confusing, but must be understood if the book's meaning is to be clear. The use of the plural rather than the singular self-reference, goes to the heart of the book's meaning. The collectivist society in which Equality 7-2521 lives is similar to the Nazi and Communist states of the twentieth century. The rulers of this society do not permit any individual to think freely; all must subordinate themselves to the state. "Collectivism," Ayn Rand notes, "means the subjugation of the individual to the group whether to a race, class or state does not matter." Under such conditions, a person is not regarded as an autonomous individual with a life of his or her own, but as a fragment of...
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