Our sense of Clyde as an outsider is strong as he explores Lycurgus

Our sense of Clyde as an outsider is strong as he explores Lycurgus

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Our sense of Clyde as an outsider is strong as he explores Lycurgus, bends to Gilbert's will, and gazes on the Griffiths' mansion. Almost like a trespasser he enters his uncle's iron gates and seats himself at a respectful distance from his aristocratic aunt; from afar, he envies Gilbert's airs. Understanding her son's resentment toward Clyde, Elizabeth Griffiths adroitly reinforces Clyde's role as a social outsider when she informs Bertine and Sondra that her husband's generosity alone brings his poor relative here. From Sondra, Clyde feels destined to win not even a glance. Some form of inadequacy accounts for most of the pretense in this section. Anxious to impress his uncle, Clyde exaggerates, giving the impression that his father is in religious work and the hotel business. Clyde plays to his uncle's pride in himself. From the beginning, Gilbert deceives Clyde: he business....
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online