The contrast between Clyde and the other characters and between opposing sensibilities in Clyde hims

The contrast between Clyde and the other characters and between opposing sensibilities in Clyde hims

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The contrast between Clyde and the other characters and between opposing sensibilities in Clyde  himself contributes greatly to the novel's acute irony. Guilt-ridden and self-pitying "Harry Tenet"  insists in his letters to his mother that he "just went along," that he deserted the scene of the Kansas  City car accident because he is legally blameless — the same reason Clyde offers (Book III) for  deserting the scene of the boat accident. (Although Clyde technically did not tell Sparser to drive  faster, he did remark: " . . . I wish we could hurry a little!") Though Clyde's cousin — not his uncle —  regards him as a menial, Clyde discovers that it is as easy for a Griffiths to kiss a Rita in Lycurgus as  it was difficult for a Griffiths to kiss a Hortense in Kansas City; this facile relationship negates his  promise to his mother to avoid loose companions. The Griffithses' supper invitation saves Clyde from 
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This note was uploaded on 11/27/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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