The Greek concept of tragedy on which Racine

The Greek concept of tragedy on which Racine -...

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The Greek concept of tragedy on which Racine's works are based has a religious origin. It was  meant to reflect man's position in the universe and his relationship to the divine. In its definitive form,  Greek tragedy presented a conflict between a protagonist of heroic proportions (though sometimes  haunted by a tragic flaw) and a hostile fate. In accordance with the cycle of death and resurrection,  the tragic play generally ended with the defeat of the hero and the affirmation of a new order. These features are readily apparent in Racine. Both  Andromache  and  Phaedra  have a cosmic  framework: Orestes explicitly accuses fate of his misfortune, and Phaedra attributes her weakness to  Venus' persecution. Indeed, the catastrophes that crush the protagonists have a brutality, an  inexorability that suggests a plot rather than an unfortunate accident. The characters, however, do not grovel. Orestes does not go gently into the night but shakes his fist 
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The Greek concept of tragedy on which Racine -...

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