The reader should be aware of the subtle ways in which James allows the reader to know the above fac

The reader should be aware of the subtle ways in which James allows the reader to know the above fac

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The reader should be aware of the subtle ways in which James allows the reader to know the above  facts. It is not said directly, we must read into James' offhand statements what is not stated directly.  For example, Lord Deepmere feels like going and getting tipsy. This is apparently not from a rejection  by Madame de Cintré. There is nothing between them that would allow for such a reaction. Thus, he  is probably disgusted with the duplicity of the Bellegardes. Likewise, Madame de Cintré would not  say that the conversation was to "Lord Deepmere's credit, but it is not to everyone's" if Lord  Deepmere had not conducted himself in an honorable fashion. She means it was good and  honorable for Lord Deepmere to tell her of Madame de Bellegarde's advice but it is not to Madame  de Bellegarde's credit to give such advice.
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This note was uploaded on 11/27/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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