The scene now shifts to Rome and focuses on a discussion between Antony

The scene now shifts to Rome and focuses on a discussion between Antony

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The scene now shifts to Rome and focuses on a discussion between Antony's co-triumvirs as they  discuss the problems facing the empire. Here we have our first glimpse of Caesar Octavius and  Lepidus. Although the subject of their discussion is Antony, their criticisms of him reveal a good deal  about their own characters, not all of it praiseworthy. Caesar enters reading a letter and is followed by Lepidus and their attendants. The two Romans  catalogue Antony's faults ("he fishes, drinks, and wastes / The lamps of night in revel"), and there is  heavy irony in their apparent concession that Antony's activities might be acceptable under other  circumstances. That is, Caesar says, "let's grant it is not / Amiss to tumble on the bed of Ptolemy"  (Cleopatra's former husband); of course, Julius Caesar, Octavius's uncle, enjoyed engaging in such  sexual activities. A messenger enters then with news from abroad: Pompey and two infamous pirates, Menecrates 
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This note was uploaded on 11/27/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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The scene now shifts to Rome and focuses on a discussion between Antony

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