{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

After Antony and Cleopatra have made their entrance

After Antony and Cleopatra have made their entrance - ,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
After Antony and Cleopatra have made their entrance, it is clear that Antony has indeed let himself  be seduced — body and soul — by Cleopatra's sensuality and charm. It is also clear that the  Romans in general dislike Cleopatra, in spite of her legendary ability to enchant males — or perhaps  because of it. This prejudiced view toward Cleopatra is developed throughout the play, but as we will  see, Shakespeare was not content to present her as only a one-dimensional character; she is more  than merely a sensual woman who happens to rule an entire country. As Antony and Cleopatra talk, both of them use exaggerated language to swear that their love is  greater than any other love in the world; their love, they believe, is more than this world can hold.  This is not idle overstatement, for their intense love for one another will be the cause of their deaths. 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}