His impulsiveness and his inability to make decisions make him appear weak

His impulsiveness and his inability to make decisions make him appear weak

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His impulsiveness and his inability to make decisions make him appear weak, but he is  not as weak as he appears, as the play illustrates. He is sensual, but he is also brave,  and he withstands adversity well. He is insecure about his age, to some extent, for he  worries about Cleopatra's fidelity, since he is older than she is. But in spite of his  insecurities, Antony more often than not is overconfident. He seriously underestimates his youthful opponent, Octavius Caesar; he believes that  his own vast experience and courage on the field can make up for Octavius's  inexperienced determination. He finds ultimately that they do not. Antony is finally driven  to make a choice between his allegiance to Egypt and Cleopatra — or to Rome; he must  declare his allegiance to one world or the other. He cannot have both, and it becomes  clear early in the play that Rome's problems demand his full loyalty, rather than half. 
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This note was uploaded on 11/28/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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