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NCLB RTT web-1 - What is in a name No Child Left Behind...

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What is in a name? No Child Left Behind
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Race to the Top Secretary Arne Duncan RAISING THE BAR & CLOSING GAPS http://vimeo.com/7905225 Arne Duncan Incentives of Race to the Top 2:28 seconds “Softening of sanctions” Provide rewards Raise bar—everyone ready for college Link merit pay for teachers to test scores Give teachers more autonomy Drastic measures for bottom 1% of schools http://learningmatters.tv/blog/on-the-newshour/race-to-the-top-the-race-is-on-pt2/3758/
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A Nation at Risk (1983) Prioritizes ECONOMIC needs of the nation For public benefit, schools should provide manpower to help get America out of recession and keep jobs in America. Help America deal with the threat of global competition Blamed schools, contributed to economic decline What contributes to economic decline?
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Concludes schools are in crisis . In need of major reform. 1983
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A Nation At Risk 1983 Graduation Requirements Curriculum Content Higher Standards/Expectations More Time-day/Year Improve Teaching Hold Leadership Accountable “Our society is being eroded  by a rising tide of mediocrity   that threatens our very  future as a nation and a  people.”  Schools should change … States do respond
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Schools have “squandered the gains in student achievement in the wake of the Sputnik challenge (1957)” Low quality teaching Not rigorous academic content Did not discuss past policies like tracking that had divided students or views about IQ that had limited students’ opportunities to learn, Regards schools as a monopoly that lacked competition to force higher performance Common school (public) no longer best kind of school-vouchers discussed Cannot trust localities and states Schools did not need more $ money A NATION AT RISK REPORTED A Nation at Risk (1983) led to No Child Left Behind Which made all of these views FEDERAL MANDATES Attitude?
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1980s through today— driving forces in school reform—away from poverty, equity, and dismantling segregated schools Schools as monopolies without competition to make them improve (business principle), should develop models of competition HIGHER STANDARDS HOLD SCHOOLS ACCOUNTABLE HIGH STAKES TESTING Philosophy of REAGAN’S Neo-conservatism Business Model for Economic Purposes
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President Bush’s (1988-1992) and President Clinton’s (1992-2000) education plan America 2000 and Goals 2000 RECOMMENDATIONS for states to raise standards and demonstrate proficiency in grades 4, 8, and 12 Incorporated 1990s THEMES: ACCOUNTABILITY HIGH STANDARDS But left individual STATES IN CHARGE Limited FUNDS
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