Lecture-7

Lecture-7 - Lecture 7: And, Or, Not June 10, 2010 So far,...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 7: And, Or, Not June 10, 2010 So far, we have seen that the language of mathematics starts with constant symbols and variable symbols . With the inclusion of functions symbols , we gain the ability to create expressions . An expression summarizes a calculation, which we can exhibit using a tree diagram. At the next level, we find the equality sign, which enables us to make assertions. In addition to the equality sign, the language that we are considering also contains other symbols that can be used like the equality symbol to make assertions. The most common are (is less than or equal to) and < (is strictly less than). When inserted between a pair of expressions, we get an inequality . An inequality between arithmetic expressions is true if the numbers denoted by the expressions on either side are in the order suggested by the sign. Equations and inequalities are called sentences if they do not contain variable symbols....
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Lecture-7 - Lecture 7: And, Or, Not June 10, 2010 So far,...

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