life_debt_pk

life_debt_pk - NEW YORKER FILMS PRESENTS LIFE AND DEBT A...

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NEW YORKER FILMS PRESENTS LIFE AND DEBT A Film by Stephanie Black CRITICS JURY PRIZE L.A. FILM FESTIVAL 2001 Press Contacts: Rebeca Conget New Yorker Films 16 West 61 st Street New York, NY 10023 Ph. 212-247-6110 ext. 204 Fax. 212-307-7855 Info@newyorkerfilms.com www.lifeanddebt.org
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SYNOPSIS Jamaica, land of sea, sand and sun. And a prime example of the complexities of economic globalization on the world's developing countries. Using conventional and non-conventional documentary techniques, this searing film dissects the "mechanism of debt" that is destroying local agriculture and industry in Third World countries while substituting them with sweat-shops and cheap imports. With a voice-over narration written by Jamaica Kincaid, adapted from her non-fiction book "A Small Place," "Life and Debt" is an unapologetic look at the "new world order" from the point of view of Jamaican workers, farmers, government and policy officials, who see the reality of globalization from the ground up. The documentary film includes interviews with Former Prime Minister Michael Manley, Deputy Director of the International Monetary Fund Stanley Fischer, and short commentary by President of Haiti-Jean-Bertrand Aristide and Former President of Ghana-Jerry Rawlings. But the articulate voices of those impacted by the policies of globalization are foremost.
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BACKGROUND INFORMATION Two international financial institutions wield enormous power over the lives of tens of millions of people around the world. We only recently hear about them in the major news media, and when we do, we are told that they function tirelessly to encourage "reforms," so that less-developed countries can get their economies in order. From Russia to Thailand to Bolivia to Chile to Haiti, the International Monetary Fund and World Bank offer loans of billions of dollars, provided that the recipient nations adhere to strict "structural adjustment" programs. These programs include imposing earning limits on foreign investment, devaluation of local currency to increase exports, suppressing wages, cutting social services such as health care and education, and keeping the state out of many potentially profitable endeavors. Furthermore, commercial banks take their cue from IMF/World Bank approval: Governments who won't follow IMF/World Bank prescriptions get cut off from international commercial lending as well -- no matter how well those governments may be serving their own people. With the collapse of the Eastern bloc, the free-market economy is now seen as the only viable economic system. Yet, within this system, much of the Third World is not receiving its share of global resources -- it contributes a great deal more than it receives. Every morning in Jamaica, thousands of women rise early and travel from their
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life_debt_pk - NEW YORKER FILMS PRESENTS LIFE AND DEBT A...

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