Physics II workshop_Part_66

Physics II workshop_Part_66 - 134 Standard Deviation The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 134 Standard Deviation The Gaussian is asymptotic to the axis (infinitely wide). We need a method to specify the relative widths of the curves. The standard deviation, s x or , is a measure of the width of the curves. The horizontal line shows the standard deviation (from the center to where the line crosses the curve.) We can represent the curve by a shaded box. It is darkest in the middle where most measurements occur, and fades out to zero as we go away from the center. Approximately 2/3 of the measurements lie within 1 standard deviation of the center. If we go two standard deviations out, 95% of the measurements are accounted for. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Comparing numbers. Suppose we have four measurements: A (3.8 0.5) cm, B (5.1 0.5) cm, C (3.8 0.2) cm, D (5.1 0.3) cm. These are shown in the diagram to the right. If we dont have the standard deviations we can only say that the measurements are close....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/26/2011 for the course PHY 2053 taught by Professor Lind during the Fall '09 term at FSU.

Page1 / 2

Physics II workshop_Part_66 - 134 Standard Deviation The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online